Synopsis:  Amy O’Hara, who is a coffee buyer, loses her job and becomes a full-time mom.

Things are not going well for Amy O’Hara.  She just lost her job as a coffee buyer.  Along with that, financial security.  She has a loving, talented but lazy wannabe screenwriter husband at home who refuses to get a job and help her.  And her two young children are a couple of spoiled brats.    Amy is exhausted, overwhelmed and frankly clueless about being a mother.  She was the breadwinner and Peter was a stay-at-home dad, so she never had to worry.  Now worrying is all she does.  How will she deal with everything?

Amy came across as very human to me.  She was a smart, funny and relatable character and I enjoyed my time with her overall.  The author did a great job outlining Amy’s transition from working mom to a full-time mom.  This woman had no idea what she was doing!  But she lived and learned and I felt like I was learning with her. (I have no kids, but hope to have some in the future.)  Her honesty was refreshing, and her sense of humor amazing.   I could see some similarities between the two of us.  However, there were things that I certainly didn’t agree with.  In fact, there were choices of hers that I hated.  But I mostly found her quite relatable.  Her kids were total brats most of the time.  There were times where I couldn’t blame her for wanting to escape.  Peter, Amy’s husband was written as a decent person overall.  But he was annoying and immature, and I could easily understand Amy’s desire to smack him upside his head.  I had a hard time understanding why he didn’t want to help out more financially or around the house. Why did”Daddy mode” stopped the moment Amy got fired?  But his reasons became clearer by the end of the novel.

Have you ever of the saying “It’s funny because it’s true.”?   That was often in the case of reading “Life After Coffee”.  I’m not a mother (though it is an adventure I’d like to have someday.)  But I could relate to some of Amy’s struggles.  Who doesn’t have at least one frustrating family member?  Amy struggling socially and not fitting in with the other women in the book?  Yep, I could relate to that as well.  Maybe that’s why I found the book–and her–to be funny.

Despite some blink-and-you-miss-it flaws, I thoroughly enjoyed reading “Life After Coffee”.  It was realistic without being boring.  It was fun, hilarious and refreshing.  This was Amy Franken’s first novel.  I hope she writes more.  I highly recommend it. I give it a 9 out of 10.  You can find it on Amazon.com and other online bookstores.